23-06-17

David Leavitt, Jo Govaerts, Rafik Shami, Aart van der Leeuw, Pascal Mercier, Franca Treur, Jean Anouilh, Anna Achmatova, Hanneke van Eijken

 

De Amerikaanse schrijver David Leavitt werd geboren in Pittsburgh op 23 juni 1961. Zie ook alle tags voor David Leavitt op dit blog.

Uit:While England Sleeps

“To start with, at that time I'd gone to bed with probably three dozen boys, all of them either German or English; never with a woman. Nonetheless -- and incredible thought it may seem -- I still assumed that a day would come when I would fall in love with some lovely, intelligent girl, whom I would marry and who would bear me children. And what of my attraction to men? To tell the truth, I didn't worry much about it. I pretended my homosexuality was a function of my youth, that when I "grew up" it would fall away, like baby teeth, to be replaced by something more mature and permanent. I, after all, was no pansy; the boy in Croydon who hanged himself after his father caught him in makeup and garters, he was a pansy, as was Oscar Wilde, my first-form Latin tutor, Channing's friend Peter Lovesey's brother. Pansies farted differently, and went to pubs where the barstools didn't have seats, and had very little in common with my crowd, by which I meant Higel and Horst and our other homosexual friends, all of whom were aggressively, unreservedly masculine, reveled in all things male, and held no truck with sissies and fairies, the overrefined Rupert Halliwells of the world. To the untrained eye nothing distinguished us from "normal" men.
Though I must confess that by 1936 the majority of my friends had stopped deluding themselves into believing their homosexuality was merely a phase. They claimed, rather, to have sworn off women, by choice. For them, homosexuality was an act of rebellion, a way of flouting the rigid mores of Edwardian England, but they were also fundamentally misogynists who would have much preferred living in a world devoid of things feminine, where men bred parthenogenically. Women, according to these friends, were the “class enemy” in a sexual revolution. Infuriated by our indifference to them (and to the natural order), they schemed to trap and convert us*, thus foiling the challenge we presented to the invincible heterosexual bond.
Such thinking excited me - anything smacking of rebellion did - but it also frightened me. It seemed to me then that my friends’ misogyny blinded them to the fact that heterosexual men, not women, had been up until now, and would probably always be, their most relentless enemies. My friends didn’t like women, however, and therefore couldn’t acknowledge that women might be truer comrades to us than the John Northrops whose approval we so desperately craved. So I refused to make the same choice they did, although, crucially, I still believed it was a choice.”

 

 
David Leavitt (Pittsburgh, 23 juni 1961)
Cover

Lees meer...

23-06-16

David Leavitt, Rafik Shami, Aart van der Leeuw, Pascal Mercier, Franca Treur, Jean Anouilh, Richard Bach, Anna Achmatova, Hanneke van Eijken

 

De Amerikaanse schrijver David Leavitt werd geboren in Pittsburgh op 23 juni 1961. Zie ook alle tags voor David Leavitt op dit blog.

Uit: The Two Hotel Francforts

“So that was how we came to be at the Suica that morning-the Suica, the café that, of all the cafés in Lisbon, we foreigners had chosen to colonize. We were sitting outdoors, having breakfast and watching the traffic go round the oval of the Rossio, and it was this notion of settling in Portugal that Julia was going on about, as I drank my coffee and ate a second of those delicious little flan-filled tartlets in which the Suica specializes, and she laid out a hand of solitaire, which she played incessantly, using a special set of miniature cards. Slopes-lap went the cards; natternatter went her voice, as for the hundredth time she related her mad scheme to rent an apartment or a villa in Estoril; and as I explained to her, for the hundredth time, that it was no good, because at any moment Hitler might forge an alliance with Franco, in which case Portugal would be swallowed up by the Axis. And how funny to think that when all was said and done, she was right and I was wrong! For we would have been perfectly safe in Portugal. Well, it is too late for her to lord that over me now.
It was then that the pigeons swooped-so many of them, flying so low, that I had to duck. In ducking, I knocked her cards off the table. “It’s all right, I’ll get them,” I said to Julia, and was bending to do so when my glasses fell off my face. A passing waiter, in his effort to keep his trayful of coffee cups from spilling, kicked the glasses down the pavement, right into Edward Freleng’s path. It was he who stepped on them.
“Oh, damn," he said, picking up what was left of the frames.
“Whose are these?
“They’re mine," I said, from the ground, where Iwas still trying to collect the cards: no mean feat, since a breeze had just come up-or perhaps the pigeons had churned it up-and scattered them the length of the sidewalk.
“Let me help you with that,” Edward said, and got down on his knees next to me."

 

 
David Leavitt (Pittsburgh, 23 juni 1961)

Bewaren

Lees meer...

23-06-15

David Leavitt, Aart van der Leeuw, Pascal Mercier, Franca Treur, Jean Anouilh, Richard Bach, Anna Achmatova, Hanneke van Eijken

 

De Amerikaanse schrijver David Leavitt werd geboren in Pittsburgh op 23 juni 1961. Zie ook alle tags voor David Leavitt op dit blog.

Uit: The Two Hotel Francforts

“Hotel rooms were nearly impossible to come by. People were staying up all night at the casino in Estoril, gambling, and sleeping all day on the beach. Yet we were lucky — we had a room, and a comfortable one at that. Yes, it was all right with me.
Not with Julia, though. She loathed Portugal. She loathed the shouting of the fishwives and the smell of the salted cod. She loathed the children who chased her with lottery tickets. She loathed the rich refugees who had rooms at better hotels than ours and the poor refugees who had no rooms at all and the mysterious woman on our floor who spent most of every day leaning out her door into the dark corridor, smoking — “like Messalina waiting for Silius,” Julia aid. But what she loathed most — what she loathed more than any of these — was the prospect of going home.
Oh, how she didn’t want to go home! It had been this way from the beginning. First she had tried to convince me to stay in Paris; then, when the bombs started dropping on Paris, to resettle in the South of France; then, when Mussolini started making noises about invading the South of France, to sail to En gland, which the Neutrality Act forbade us from doing (for which she would not forgive Roo se velt). And now she wanted to stay on in Portugal. Portugal!
I should mention — I can mention, since Julia is dead now and cannot stop me — that my wife was Jewish, a fact she preferred to keep under wraps. And it is true, in Portugal there was no anti- Semitism to speak of, quite simply because there were no Jews. The Inquisition had taken care of that little problem. And so she had decided that this country in which she was so disinclined to spend a few weeks would be a perfectly agreeable place to sit out the rest of the war. For she had sworn, when we had settled in Paris fifteen years before, that she would never go home again as long as she lived.
Well, she never did.“

 

 
David Leavitt (Pittsburgh, 23 juni 1961)

Lees meer...

23-06-14

David Leavitt, Aart van der Leeuw, Pascal Mercier, Franca Treur, Jean Anouilh, Richard Bach, Anna Achmatova, Hanneke van Eijken

 

De Amerikaanse schrijver David Leavitt werd geboren in Pittsburgh op 23 juni 1961. Zie ook alle tags voor David Leavitt op dit blog.

Uit: The Two Hotel Francforts

“We met the Frelengs in Lisbon, at the Café Suiça. This was in June 1940, when we were all in Lisbon waiting for the ship that was coming to rescue us and take us to New York. By us I mean, of course, us Americans, expatriates of long standing mostly, for whom the prospect of returning home was a bitter one. Now it seems churlish to speak of our plight, which was as nothing compared with that of the real refugees - the Europeans, the Jews, the European Jews. Yet at the time we were too worried about what we were losing to care about those who were losing more.
Julia and I had been in Lisbon almost a week. I am from Indianapolis; she grew up on Central Park West but had dreamed, all through her youth, of a flat in Paris. Well, I made that dream come true for her — to a degree. That is to say, we had the flat. We had the furniture. Yet she was never satisfied, my Julia. I always supposed I was the piece that didn’t fit.
In any case, that summer, Hitler’s invasion of France had compelled us to abandon our Paris establishment and fly headlong to Lisbon, there to await the SS Manhattan, which the State Department had commandeered and dispatched to retrieve stranded Americans. At the time, only four steamships—the Excalibur, the Excambion, the Exeter, and the Exochorda—were making the regular crossing to New York. They were so named, it was joked, because they carried ex-Europeans into exile. Each had a capacity of something like 125 passengers, as opposed to the Manhattan’s 1, 20 0, and, like the Clipper flights that took offeach week from the Tag us, you couldn’t get a booking on one for love or money unless you were a diplomat or a VIP.
And so we had about a week to kill in Lisbon until the Manhattan arrived, which was fine by me, since we had had quite a time of it up until then, dodging shellfire and mortar fire all the way across France, then running the gantlet of the Spanish border crossing and contending with the Spanish customs agents, who in their interrogation tactics were determined to prove themselves more Nazi than the Nazis. And Lisbon was a city at peace, which meant that everything that was scarce in France and Spain was plentiful there: meat, cigarettes, gin. The only trouble was overcrowding.”

 

 
David Leavitt (Pittsburgh, 23 juni 1961)

Lees meer...

29-05-14

Hemelvaart (Aart van der Leeuw)

 

Bij Hemelvaartsdag

 

 

 
  Hemelvaart door Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, 1636

 

 

Hemelvaart

Als ik beklim de zilvren treden,
Langzaam, en de aarde diep beneden,
Een klein insect in avondglans,
De vonk doet spranklen van zijn dans,

Laat mij dan in mijn armen dragen
De zacht gepelsde, die behagen
Zelfs in de schim zijns meesters vindt,
Warm aan zijn borst zich vleit, en spint;

En dat de hond, wild als een jongen,
Over de heemlen aangesprongen,
Blaffend met meteoren vecht,
En kwisplend ze aan mijn voeten legt;

Het milde rund laat met mij komen,
Het is misschien wat log voor dromen,
a denk, dat het toch ongevraagd
Zijn uier naar de melkweg draagt;

Dat ook de krekel, op wiens zingen
Ik vaak tot voor de troon mocht dringen,
Nu ik nog nader ben bij Hem,
Mij overweldge met zijn stem;

Laat dan de valk, die zonder vrezen
Tot in het hart der zon kan lezen,
De vleuglen uit elkander slaan,
Zodat de deuren opengaan,

En ik tezaam met mijn geleide,
Op een bebloemde lenteweide,
Een door de wind gebogen vlam,
Zal nederknielen voor het lam.

 

 


Aart van der Leeuw (23 juni 1876 – 17 april 1931)
Delft, wijk Hof van Delft, Buiyenwatersloot
(Aart van der Leeuw werd geboren in Hof van Delft)



Zie voor de schrijvers van de 29e mei ook mijn vorige blog van vandaag.

23-06-13

Aart van der Leeuw

 

De Nederlandse dichter en schrijver Aart van der Leeuw in Hof van Delft op 23 juni 1876. Van der Leeuw, kwam uit een koopmansfamilie en volgde een gymnasiumopleiding in Delft, die hij met moeite na herexamens in 1898 wist af te ronden, toen hij al 22 jaar oud was. Van der Leeuw werd geplaagd door woordblindheid en een toenemende doofheid. Beide aandoeningen droegen bij aan de problemen die hij bij zijn studie en werk ondervond. Hij studeerde rechten aan de Gemeente Universiteit van Amsterdam, niet zozeer omdat hij zich daarvoor interesseerde, maar omdat het een korte studie was met gunstige maatschappelijke vooruitzichten. Na zijn promotie werkte hij korte tijd op het gemeentearchief van Delft, en vanaf 1903 als 'chef de bureau' bij de Levensverzekeringsmaatschappij Dordrecht. In datzelfde jaar trouwde hij met zijn vroegere schoolvriendin Antonia Johanna Kipp. Uit dit huwelijk zijn geen kinderen voortgekomen. Van der Leeuw had het bij de Dordtse verzekeringmaatschappij niet naar zijn zin. Zijn zwakke gezondheid greep hij uiteindelijk aan om in 1907 ontslag te nemen. Door het overlijden van zijn schoonouders viel hem en zijn vrouw een bescheiden erfenis ten deel, net genoeg om zelfstandig te kunnen leven. Het paar vestigde zich in Voorburg, waar Van der Leeuw zich wijdde aan het vioolspel en aan zijn schrijverschap. In 1928 werd hem de C.W. van der Hoogtprijs toegekend door de Maatschappij der Nederlandsche Letterkunde te Leiden.Hij schreef niet een zeer omvangrijk oeuvre, maar zijn boeken “Ik en mijn speelman uit 1927” en “De kleine Rudolf” uit 1930 worden gezien als klassiekers van de Nederlandse 20ste-eeuwse letterkunde. Opmerkelijk aan zijn poëzie is dat hij zich toelegde op het prozagedicht.

Uit: Ik en mijn speelman

“Ik houd er van, om in een bloemruiker een distel te steken, of op een fruitschaal tusschen de vruchten een schubbigen sparappel te leggen. Daarom had ik in het huis, waar voor de liefde betaald wordt, den gebochelden muzikant, die zooeven, als uit den hemel gevallen, voor mijn stilhoudenden draagstoel stond, en mij behulpzaam is geweest bij het uitstijgen, mee naar binnen genomen.
In de feestzaal war en alle kaarsen aangestoken, en deden hun lichtjes in het kristal van de spiegels, in de juweelen van kapsels, keurzen en de ge vest en der degens weertintelen. Vijf vrienden, vijf vrouwen. De komst van mijn speelman werd met handgeklap en gejubel begroet. ‘Het is maar gemakkelijk,’ werd er geroepen, ‘om je vioolkist aan je vastgegroeid bij je te dragen, zoodat er geen kans is, dat je hem ooit zult vergeten,’ en een ander vroeg hem, of hij op het hoofd kon staan als de nar van den koning. Lachend zette hij zich op een lage taboeret in een hoek van de kamer, en stemde zijn gitaar.
Ik schudde de kaarten. Ik zou de bank houden. De winst moest ons, den bezoekers, in kussen worden uitgeteld, ons verlies zou betaald worden in gouden dukaten.
Wij lieten den muzikant van den wijn brengen, en wierpen hem, zooals je een hond een brok geeft van den maaltijd, af en toe een geldstuk voor de voeten. Daarvoor zong hij met een heesch geluid de gebruikelijke liedjes, ze op zijn instrument begeleidend. Sommigen neurieden het refrein mee, anderen riepen kwinkslagen, of namen schaterend de bestraffing in ontvangst voor hun vrijpostigheden. Somtijds, plotseling, viel een stilte in, zoo een, die je weemoedig maakt en verlegen, en waarbij vergeten dingen in je herinnering komen: een groene bank onder een linde, kinderen, en het jubelend roepen van je naam in de verte. Wij schertsten dit weg, of we een lastig insect van ons afsloegen.
Het werd warm in de kamer. Wij gaven den speelman een teeken. Hij opende een venster; meteen sprong de deur uit het slot; een vochtige windvlaag voer binnen, en de kaarsen doofden uit. Wij zaten in duister. Uit den nacht werd een klacht over ons gesproken, een kreet van een vogel, een ruischen, een zuchten. Toen zong de man dat lied."

 

 
Aart van der Leeuw (23 juni 1876 – 17 april 1931)

18:45 Gepost door Romenu in Literatuur | Permalink | Commentaren (0) | Tags: aart van der leeuw, romenu |  Facebook |